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Our own web design trashcan

On this page I've stuck rejected bits of web design work, with explanations of why they were ultimately trashed, so that students of web design might learn something. On reflection, I realise it's not a very exciting page, though, so you might just want to check out the rest of this site in general or the other rubbish commentaries in particular.

The trash

Here (you'll see it when you scroll down, below) is a design for this site, NewMediaStudies.com, which I thought would be cool. The main page was completely white except for there being a [picture of a] computer sitting in the middle of the screen. If you waved the mouse pointer over the keyboard, the screen showed the internal pages you could go to (different parts of the keyboard revealed different links).

I thought this was quite sophisticated because it was the opposite of a garish "CLICK HERE FOR THIS!" presentation. I thought that people would still know what to do, because when it's not obvious what to do on a website then what I usually do is wave the mouse around the screen to see if the pointer turns to a hand, revealing links.

So I spent ages making it, but was quite pleased. I added a graphic that would pop up on the screen telling you to wave the mouse over the keyboard, to make things easier.

Then I got a friend to have a go on it. They managed to use this interface quite well, but it was not exactly intuitive. Furthermore, although they easily got the hang of moving the mouse left to right over the keyboard to see different options, they didn't use the full (rather tight) up and down range, which meant that they didn't see the full range of options.

And the whole thing was a bit annoying because even if you knew which page you wanted to go to, you still had to fiddle with the mouse over the image of the keyboard in order to find it.

In short -- it was clever-looking but did not have purity in the ease of use department. Have a look yourself (scroll down).

 


 

 

 


 

So then I added text links as well, but that rather took away the point of the minimalist design. Then I got bored with the whole thing anyway, and I decided that a site about technology (and people's uses of it) shouldn't look stereotypically technological. So that was when the snails and flowers arrived (see FAQ for more about the flower design, if you're not bored already).

Back to other new media rubbish.
 

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